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Thread: D.C.I. Banks

  1. #1
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    Cool D.C.I. Banks

    DCI Banks
    Episode: 1 of 6
    Wednesday, 10 October 2012, 9:00PM - 10:00PM
    Drama


    NEW SERIES:

    Strange Affair (1 of 2):

    With DS Annie Cabbot pregnant and due to start her maternity leave, DCI Alan Banks is feeling low, until a mysterious phone message leads him to Harrogate to search for his estranged younger brother, Roy.

    Meanwhile, at the scene of the murder of a young woman found in her car near Eastvale, Banks’ team are introduced to DI Helen Morton, drafted to cover Annie’s imminent departure. Uncomfortable working as part of a team and often tactless, Helen quickly alienates her new colleagues.

    Matters are made worse when the team discover DCI Banks’ name and address in the pocket of the victim, Jennifer Lewis, and unable to locate him, Helen speculates that their boss could be a suspect in the case. Unaware that his team are searching for him, Banks begins to delve into the life of his brother, and soon uncovers questionable business transactions and associates, as well as an angry fiancée and an affair.

    Could Banks’ brother be the killer his team are searching for?
    Love many, trust few, always paddle your own canoe

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  3. #2
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    DCI Banks
    Episode: 2 of 6
    Wednesday, 17 October 2012, 9:00PM - 10:00PM

    Strange Affair (2/2):

    With Roy dead, Banks must return to his childhood home to inform his parents. Whilst there, simmering resentments between Banks and his father and the acute sense of distance between Banks and his younger brother, begin to surface.

    When Banks’ parents, desperate for answers, plead with their son to find out what happened to Roy, Banks defies DI Helen Morton and returns to the station to try and lead the investigation into the murders of Roy and Jennifer Lewis. Both convinced that the answer to the case lies with Carmen, an ‘exotic companion’ being treated at the Berger-Lennox clinic, Banks and Helen agree to put their differences aside to help each other get to the truth.

    But when Banks is finally able to track Carmen, her evidence appears to make the case more complicated than ever. Soon, both detectives are thrown into a dark investigation that ultimately shakes both officers to the core…
    Love many, trust few, always paddle your own canoe

  4. #3
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    DCI Banks

    Episode: 3*of*6
    Wednesday, 24 October 2012,*9:00PM*-*10:00PM
    Drama

    *


    Dry Bones That Dream (1/2):

    DCI Alan Banks and DI Helen Morton must learn to reconcile their conflicting policing styles and personalities whilst trying to unravel the increasingly puzzling murder of a local accountant who has been leading a secret double life.

    ***

    When a professional hitman bursts into the luxurious house of Keith Rothwell and his family and shoots the accountant in cold blood, DCI Banks is instantly struck by the strange reactions of the victim’s family. Before the team can get a grip on the case, evidence comes to light that Rothwell has been living a secret double life and Banks is instantly attracted to ‘the other woman’ in Rothwell’s life, Pamela Jeffries. Now investigating the murder of a victim with literally two identities, a possible link to a major money laundering scam blows the case wide open and drags Banks into a high profile fraud investigation with political ramifications and into conflict with an old police rival. With DI Helen Morton struggling to fit into her new surroundings, seemingly unable to relax amongst the team and Banks uncertain of his place in a changing police landscape, both officers are struck by the fluid nature of identity in the case. Who was Keith Rothwell really and who wanted the man dead?
    Last edited by alan45; 08-10-2012 at 16:14.
    Love many, trust few, always paddle your own canoe

  5. #4
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    DCI Banks
    Episode: 4 of 6
    Wednesday, 31 October 2012, 9:00PM - 10:00PM
    Drama



    Dry Bones That Dream (2/2):

    Short Synopsis:

    DCI Alan Banks and DI Helen Morton must learn to reconcile their conflicting policing styles and personalities whilst trying to unravel the increasingly puzzling murder of a local accountant who has been leading a secret double life.

    Mid Synopsis:

    When a professional hitman bursts into the luxurious house of Keith Rothwell and his family and shoots the accountant in cold blood, DCI Banks is instantly struck by the strange reactions of the victim’s family. Before the team can get a grip on the case, evidence comes to light that Rothwell has been living a secret double life and Banks is instantly attracted to ‘the other woman’ in Rothwell’s life, Pamela Jeffries. Now investigating the murder of a victim with literally two identities, a possible link to a major money laundering scam blows the case wide open and drags Banks into a high profile fraud investigation with political ramifications and into conflict with an old police rival. With DI Helen Morton struggling to fit into her new surroundings, seemingly unable to relax amongst the team and Banks uncertain of his place in a changing police landscape, both officers are struck by the fluid nature of identity in the case. Who was Keith Rothwell really and who wanted the man dead?

    Long Synopsis:

    Late at night, Keith Rothwell and his wife Mary return in silence from a meal to celebrate their wedding anniversary. As they enter the house, they notice that their daughter Hannah has been bound and gagged to a chair. Before they can react, they are overpowered by a masked intruder. A few minutes later, Mary and Alison are both tied to chairs as they hear the deafening sound of a shotgun from just outside…

    Early the next morning, DCI Alan Banks arrives at Arkbeck Farm, already a hive of SOCO and police activity. Banks joins DI Helen Morton, who with the rest of the team has already assessed the rather gory murder scene. Banks’ easy banter with the rest of the team falls flat with Helen. Banks is shown the body in the garage…and the headless corpse is identified as Keith Rothwell. Banks and the team move into the house, the size of which illustrates that the Rothwells are clearly a family of considerable wealth. As Banks asks for a description of the shooter to be circulated, he learns that Mary Rothwell has taken sedatives and gone to bed, but Hannah is awake…although she seems more concerned about making Banks and his team comfortable than she does about her own father’s murder.

    Back at the station, McLaughlin immediately jumps on the team; extra resources have been made available to set up roadblocks around major routes out of the area in the hope of catching Rothwell’s killer and McLaughlin makes it clear that he wants to use them to get a quick result. Banks speculates as to where the ‘extra resources’ may have come from, but lets the issue lie for now. Banks notes that Helen hasn’t personalised her desk since joining the team, but Helen can’t see the point of it.

    Banks briefs the team; this murder looks like a professional hit. So who would want to take a contract out on a Yorkshire accountant? Ken suggests that the team should organise a pub visit to welcome Helen to the team…but Helen can only respond that she doesn’t like pubs. The briefing is interrupted by news that SOCO have found something of interest at the crime scene and as they leave the station, Banks and Helen are mobbed by the press. Meanwhile, Arthur Jameson, clearly the hitman who shot Rothwell, searches the moors for his payment…but finding nothing becomes extremely agitated.

    On route to Arkbeck, Banks tries to break the ice with his new colleague, but Helen is simply bemused at Banks’ lack of understanding of social media and can’t seem to understand why Banks doesn’t want to be referred to by rank. At the crime scene, SOCO explain that they have found part of the wadding used in the shotgun cartridge that killed Rothwell and it appears to have been made from a unique pornographic magazine. While Banks and Helen consider the implications of this news, Arthur Jameson sits in a greasy spoon, watching news coverage of the murder investigation and thinks out his next move…

    Winsome interviews Rothwell’s previous employer at a local accountancy firm and learns that Rothwell was considered a very ordinary, unremarkable employee. Only when pushing Mr Pratt further does Winsome discover that Rothwell’s years of service came to an end when he was sacked for fiddling timesheets…

    Still at Arkbeck, Banks and Helen are informed that Rothwell’s computers will need to be taken away for analysis. Now the pair meet the formidable Mary Rothwell, who seems more worried about what the papers will report about the murder than the fact that her husband has been shot dead. Mary seems oddly detached from her husband and it is clear that they didn’t get on, but she maintains the picture of Rothwell as an extremely boring man who didn’t even holiday abroad. Helen is angered when Mary appears to show no interest in helping Hannah come to terms with what has happened and Banks is forced to send her to coordinate door-to-door enquiries. Studying a postcard, Banks learns that Mary also has a son, Tom, who is travelling across America and pointedly hasn’t written to his father for three months. Banks leaves; Mary is steely and he feels that he hasn’t really scratched the surface…

    In a local pub, Helen learns from Kerry, a young girl who used to clean at Arkbeck, that Mary’s description of Rothwell family life doesn’t quite ring true; apparently Tom and his father hated each other! Back at the station, McLaughlin demands an update from Banks. Banks summarises his thinking; Rothwell was notoriously tight with money, but he suspects that Keith was dealing in specialist porn (evidence of which will soon be uncovered on his computer) which was how he was making his real money. Banks is almost certain that one of the family took out the contract on Rothwell and a result is imminent. However, Helen soon wipes the smile off Banks’ face when she reveals a new lead; the photograph of Rothwell in the local paper has led to a call from a member of the public, who claims the victim isn’t Rothwell at all…his name is Robert Calvert.

    On their way to Leeds, Banks and Helen talk openly; Helen admits that she isn’t fitting in well and asks for Banks’ advice, much to his surprise. Is she really this socially inept? Banks and Helen meet Pamela Jeffries who confirms that she knew the man found dead at Arkbeck as Robert Calvert…but her description of the man – fun, funny, adventurous – couldn’t be further from the current description of Rothwell. Pamela is a beautiful, well-travelled classical musician and Banks is increasingly attracted to her and her lifestyle as the interview continues.

    Winsome contacts Banks and tells him that there is no porn on Rothwell’s computer, but there are account details which appear to link him to a Leeds solicitor by the name of Daniel Norcliffe. The pornographic wadding has been analysed and it is pretty niche; Ken is tasked with searching online databases for names of people who might have bought such porn. Banks travels with Pamela to the flat which Robert Calvert used in Leeds. The mess in the flat confirms that the personality of Calvert could not be further from Rothwell’s. Meanwhile, Helen travels to Norcliffe’s office and discovers that Norcliffe has mysteriously disappeared…

    Back at the station, to Banks’ dismay, he finds McLaughlin with an old rival, DCI Stuart Burgess. Burgess is working for the Serious Organised Crimes Agency (and is the source of McLaughlin’s extra resources). Burgess explains he is part of a two year investigation into fraud and money laundering centred on local MP Martin Fleming. Fleming was at university with Daniel Norcliffe and it appears Rothwell was recruited by him to assist in the operation. Burgess isn’t interested in how this might explain Rothwell’s murder, he just doesn’t want Banks anywhere near Fleming or anyone connected with him that might threaten his investigation. Banks is furious that his investigation is being hampered by Burgess. Winsome then confirms the worst - the fingerprints at Calvert’s flat match the dead body at Arkbeck…Calvert and Rothwell, impossible as it may seem, are the same man. The team have a new motive and suspect; what if Rothwell were creaming money from the laundering operation to fund his lifestyle and when Norcliffe found out, he had Rothwell taken out?

    Ken must now try to find a match between the porn databases he has been searching and the criminal referrals of Norcliffe, in the hope of identifying the shooter. Helen and Winsome confront Mary Rothwell with all they have learnt about her husband so far, but Mary doesn’t seem to think that Rothwell had the imagination for such an elaborate affair and denies any knowledge of his secret life.

    Banks returns to see Pamela and informs her that someone has broken into Calvert’s flat, leaving no forensic evidence. The two bond over music and Pamela lends Banks her most treasured possession; an original vinyl Ella Fitzgerald recording. Banks promises to return it to her. Helen reports to Banks that there has been a break in at Norcliffe’s offices…clearly the team aren’t the only ones searching for Norcliffe.

    Banks goes home and plays Pamela’s record – she is clearly on his mind. Meanwhile, Pamela opens the door of her house to find Arthur Jameson standing before her and as Banks tries to call her to no avail, Pamela is savagely beaten…
    Love many, trust few, always paddle your own canoe

  6. #5
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    DCI Banks
    Episode: 4 of 6
    Wednesday, 31 October 2012, 9:00PM - 10:00PM
    Drama



    Dry Bones That Dream (2/2):

    Short Synopsis:

    DCI Alan Banks and DI Helen Morton must learn to reconcile their conflicting policing styles and personalities whilst trying to unravel the increasingly puzzling murder of a local accountant who has been leading a secret double life.

    Mid Synopsis:

    When a professional hitman bursts into the luxurious house of Keith Rothwell and his family and shoots the accountant in cold blood, DCI Banks is instantly struck by the strange reactions of the victim’s family. Before the team can get a grip on the case, evidence comes to light that Rothwell has been living a secret double life and Banks is instantly attracted to ‘the other woman’ in Rothwell’s life, Pamela Jeffries. Now investigating the murder of a victim with literally two identities, a possible link to a major money laundering scam blows the case wide open and drags Banks into a high profile fraud investigation with political ramifications and into conflict with an old police rival. With DI Helen Morton struggling to fit into her new surroundings, seemingly unable to relax amongst the team and Banks uncertain of his place in a changing police landscape, both officers are struck by the fluid nature of identity in the case. Who was Keith Rothwell really and who wanted the man dead?

    Long Synopsis:

    Late at night, Keith Rothwell and his wife Mary return in silence from a meal to celebrate their wedding anniversary. As they enter the house, they notice that their daughter Hannah has been bound and gagged to a chair. Before they can react, they are overpowered by a masked intruder. A few minutes later, Mary and Alison are both tied to chairs as they hear the deafening sound of a shotgun from just outside…

    Early the next morning, DCI Alan Banks arrives at Arkbeck Farm, already a hive of SOCO and police activity. Banks joins DI Helen Morton, who with the rest of the team has already assessed the rather gory murder scene. Banks’ easy banter with the rest of the team falls flat with Helen. Banks is shown the body in the garage…and the headless corpse is identified as Keith Rothwell. Banks and the team move into the house, the size of which illustrates that the Rothwells are clearly a family of considerable wealth. As Banks asks for a description of the shooter to be circulated, he learns that Mary Rothwell has taken sedatives and gone to bed, but Hannah is awake…although she seems more concerned about making Banks and his team comfortable than she does about her own father’s murder.

    Back at the station, McLaughlin immediately jumps on the team; extra resources have been made available to set up roadblocks around major routes out of the area in the hope of catching Rothwell’s killer and McLaughlin makes it clear that he wants to use them to get a quick result. Banks speculates as to where the ‘extra resources’ may have come from, but lets the issue lie for now. Banks notes that Helen hasn’t personalised her desk since joining the team, but Helen can’t see the point of it.

    Banks briefs the team; this murder looks like a professional hit. So who would want to take a contract out on a Yorkshire accountant? Ken suggests that the team should organise a pub visit to welcome Helen to the team…but Helen can only respond that she doesn’t like pubs. The briefing is interrupted by news that SOCO have found something of interest at the crime scene and as they leave the station, Banks and Helen are mobbed by the press. Meanwhile, Arthur Jameson, clearly the hitman who shot Rothwell, searches the moors for his payment…but finding nothing becomes extremely agitated.

    On route to Arkbeck, Banks tries to break the ice with his new colleague, but Helen is simply bemused at Banks’ lack of understanding of social media and can’t seem to understand why Banks doesn’t want to be referred to by rank. At the crime scene, SOCO explain that they have found part of the wadding used in the shotgun cartridge that killed Rothwell and it appears to have been made from a unique pornographic magazine. While Banks and Helen consider the implications of this news, Arthur Jameson sits in a greasy spoon, watching news coverage of the murder investigation and thinks out his next move…

    Winsome interviews Rothwell’s previous employer at a local accountancy firm and learns that Rothwell was considered a very ordinary, unremarkable employee. Only when pushing Mr Pratt further does Winsome discover that Rothwell’s years of service came to an end when he was sacked for fiddling timesheets…

    Still at Arkbeck, Banks and Helen are informed that Rothwell’s computers will need to be taken away for analysis. Now the pair meet the formidable Mary Rothwell, who seems more worried about what the papers will report about the murder than the fact that her husband has been shot dead. Mary seems oddly detached from her husband and it is clear that they didn’t get on, but she maintains the picture of Rothwell as an extremely boring man who didn’t even holiday abroad. Helen is angered when Mary appears to show no interest in helping Hannah come to terms with what has happened and Banks is forced to send her to coordinate door-to-door enquiries. Studying a postcard, Banks learns that Mary also has a son, Tom, who is travelling across America and pointedly hasn’t written to his father for three months. Banks leaves; Mary is steely and he feels that he hasn’t really scratched the surface…

    In a local pub, Helen learns from Kerry, a young girl who used to clean at Arkbeck, that Mary’s description of Rothwell family life doesn’t quite ring true; apparently Tom and his father hated each other! Back at the station, McLaughlin demands an update from Banks. Banks summarises his thinking; Rothwell was notoriously tight with money, but he suspects that Keith was dealing in specialist porn (evidence of which will soon be uncovered on his computer) which was how he was making his real money. Banks is almost certain that one of the family took out the contract on Rothwell and a result is imminent. However, Helen soon wipes the smile off Banks’ face when she reveals a new lead; the photograph of Rothwell in the local paper has led to a call from a member of the public, who claims the victim isn’t Rothwell at all…his name is Robert Calvert.

    On their way to Leeds, Banks and Helen talk openly; Helen admits that she isn’t fitting in well and asks for Banks’ advice, much to his surprise. Is she really this socially inept? Banks and Helen meet Pamela Jeffries who confirms that she knew the man found dead at Arkbeck as Robert Calvert…but her description of the man – fun, funny, adventurous – couldn’t be further from the current description of Rothwell. Pamela is a beautiful, well-travelled classical musician and Banks is increasingly attracted to her and her lifestyle as the interview continues.

    Winsome contacts Banks and tells him that there is no porn on Rothwell’s computer, but there are account details which appear to link him to a Leeds solicitor by the name of Daniel Norcliffe. The pornographic wadding has been analysed and it is pretty niche; Ken is tasked with searching online databases for names of people who might have bought such porn. Banks travels with Pamela to the flat which Robert Calvert used in Leeds. The mess in the flat confirms that the personality of Calvert could not be further from Rothwell’s. Meanwhile, Helen travels to Norcliffe’s office and discovers that Norcliffe has mysteriously disappeared…

    Back at the station, to Banks’ dismay, he finds McLaughlin with an old rival, DCI Stuart Burgess. Burgess is working for the Serious Organised Crimes Agency (and is the source of McLaughlin’s extra resources). Burgess explains he is part of a two year investigation into fraud and money laundering centred on local MP Martin Fleming. Fleming was at university with Daniel Norcliffe and it appears Rothwell was recruited by him to assist in the operation. Burgess isn’t interested in how this might explain Rothwell’s murder, he just doesn’t want Banks anywhere near Fleming or anyone connected with him that might threaten his investigation. Banks is furious that his investigation is being hampered by Burgess. Winsome then confirms the worst - the fingerprints at Calvert’s flat match the dead body at Arkbeck…Calvert and Rothwell, impossible as it may seem, are the same man. The team have a new motive and suspect; what if Rothwell were creaming money from the laundering operation to fund his lifestyle and when Norcliffe found out, he had Rothwell taken out?

    Ken must now try to find a match between the porn databases he has been searching and the criminal referrals of Norcliffe, in the hope of identifying the shooter. Helen and Winsome confront Mary Rothwell with all they have learnt about her husband so far, but Mary doesn’t seem to think that Rothwell had the imagination for such an elaborate affair and denies any knowledge of his secret life.

    Banks returns to see Pamela and informs her that someone has broken into Calvert’s flat, leaving no forensic evidence. The two bond over music and Pamela lends Banks her most treasured possession; an original vinyl Ella Fitzgerald recording. Banks promises to return it to her. Helen reports to Banks that there has been a break in at Norcliffe’s offices…clearly the team aren’t the only ones searching for Norcliffe.

    Banks goes home and plays Pamela’s record – she is clearly on his mind. Meanwhile, Pamela opens the door of her house to find Arthur Jameson standing before her and as Banks tries to call her to no avail, Pamela is savagely beaten…
    Love many, trust few, always paddle your own canoe

  7. #6
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    DCI Banks
    Episode: 5 of 6
    Wednesday, 7 November 2012, 9:00PM - 10:00PM
    Drama


    Innocent Graves (1/2)

    Logline:

    When a teenage schoolgirl is found strangled, Banks and his team quickly identify their prime suspect. But the closer Banks seemingly moves towards a conviction, the more the course of the investigation distances him from Helen.

    Short Synopsis:

    Frustrated with a number of recent cases being knocked back by the CPS, Banks and his team are called on to investigate the murder of teenager Ellie Clayton, daughter of a successful internet entrepreneur. The suggestion that Ellie might have been raped, as well as her background, means that the investigation is soon the subject of intense media speculation and Banks promises Ellie’s parents that they will bring the culprit to justice. Sure enough, the team quickly uncover strong evidence against Owen Pierce, a local theatre director who ran the drama workshop Ellie attended on the night that she died. Under questioning, Owen proves himself to be a liar and slightly obsessed with his ex-girlfriend Maddy Phillips, who bears a more than passing resemblance to Ellie. When clear forensic evidence links Pierce to the scene of the crime, Banks is confident that he has his man and Owen is charged. But with Pierce’s trial set, DI Morton voices her concerns; Banks’ instinct might be telling him that Pierce is guilty, but is he looking at all the evidence? There are plenty of other potential suspects, not least Ellie’s bad-boy former boyfriend, Tyler Judd. In court, Banks soon finds not just Owen Pierce, but the actions of his entire team and his friendship with Helen on trial…

    Long Synopsis:

    DCI Alan Banks breaks the bad news to his team…their latest case has been knocked back by the CPS; insufficient evidence to warrant a murder charge. Ken Blackstone in particular is hit hard by the outcome, having worked hard on the case. Banks’ frustration spills over in a meeting with McLaughlin and Helen about a recent run of cases that have failed to find favour with the CPS and he worries aloud about the impact on the morale of his team. Although McLaughlin agrees, before he can answer Banks properly, Winsome interrupts the meeting with the sombre news that Ellie Clayton’s body has been found.

    At Eastvale Valley Park, Banks and Helen are lead to Ellie’s body, which has been found close to a stone sculpture that is apparently a well-known meeting place for local teenagers. Dr Burns explains that Ellie has been strangled with her own school tie, but whilst her underwear has been ripped, forensics are unable to ascertain whether or not she has been raped from an initial examination. There is plenty of blood running down Ellie’s face, but this is dismissed as a non-fatal scalp wound. Clearly, Ellie’s school bag has been searched and there is no sign of her phone. Winsome informs Banks and Helen that a local man at the cordon is asking to speak to the officer in charge…

    As Banks and Helen move away from the crime scene, they are joined at the cordon by Glen Painter, a local newspaper reporter who begins to quiz the detectives for information about the incident. Glen proves himself to be one step ahead when he asks for confirmation that the body is Daniel Clayton’s daughter. Giving nothing away, Banks brushes Glen off and moves on to Mr Clarke, a local resident who reports noticing an unfamiliar car blocking his driveway around the time of the murder. Clarke provides a description of the owner of the vehicle – wearing a distinctive cap and jacket – and the car itself – dark blue and with a broken rear light – and Banks instructs Winsome to get him in with E-fit. Could this be Ellie’s killer?

    On route to the Clayton house, Helen explains that Daniel Clayton is co-founder of a successful auction website called lastchancetobuy.com and as such Ellie’s death is likely to have a high media profile. Once at the house, Banks and Helen meet Simon Harris, Daniel Clayton’s business partner, who along with his wife is trying to comfort the Clayton’s as they face the news of their daughter’s death. Sophie explains that Ellie had told her parents that she was going to get a pizza with her friend Becca Smith after her regular Friday night drama workshop, but when Ellie didn’t come home, they discovered through Becca that this was a lie. The relationship between the Clayton’s is strained and they appear more reliant on the Harris’ for support than each other. Daniel Clayton appears utterly devastated at his daughter’s death. Banks promises the Clayton’s that he will find whoever is responsible for this murder…

    Meanwhile, Owen Pierce, leader of Ellie’s drama workshop watches as Maddy Phillips hands out leaflets at a local shopping centre, clearly infatuated with her. At the same time Tyler Judd, a local bad-boy douses his car in petrol and lighting a cigarette, sets about burning his vehicle…

    Back at the station, Banks briefs the team. Winsome and Ken agree to interview Owen Pierce, since Ellie was last seen outside his drama workshop. Banks urges everyone to focus on the man and car seen by Mr Clarke near the murder scene close to Ellie’s murder – who was he and what was he doing there? As the briefing ends, Banks receives a message that Simon Harris would like to speak to him and travels to the lastchancetobuy.com offices. Simon informs Banks that he thinks Ellie might have had a boyfriend, but he was reluctant to share this knowledge with the Claytons. Harris claims that he came home a few months ago to find Ellie bunking off school and drinking with an older boy who he practically had to throw out of the house. Ellie had promised to never see him again, but now with her death, Harris isn’t entirely convinced…

    Ken and Winsome interview Owen Pierce at his home. Pierce is polite, but there is something creepy beneath the surface that both detectives pick up on. Pierce claims that he came straight home after the drama workshop and didn’t see anyone at all on the night of Ellie’s murder. Ken receives a phone call and leaves the room to answer it, leaving Winsome feeling uncomfortable.

    Banks and Helen visit Ellie’s school. The headmistress Mrs Bentley reveals that Ellie’s academic record had begun to improve after a slight ‘wobble’ a few months earlier which remains unexplained. Helen and Banks interview Becca Smith, who claims that Ellie didn’t have a boyfriend and that she didn’t know where Ellie was going on the night of the murder; but both detectives are convinced that Becca is hiding something.

    Back at Pierce’s house, Ken notices something in the hallway as he takes his phone call which causes him to invite Winsome outside: he is convinced the cap and jacket of the mysterious man described by Mr Clarke are now hanging in Pierce’s house. Winsome rightly points out that the cap and jacket aren’t enough evidence to arrest Pierce, no matter how creepy he might seem. But when Ken also notices a car matching Mr Clarke’s exact description in the driveway, Winsome too becomes convinced that Pierce isn’t telling them the whole truth.

    Banks returns to the Clayton house to look through Ellie’s room, where he observes that the relationship between father and daughter was unusually close. Meanwhile Helen goes to the mortuary, where Dr Glendenning explains that the post mortem has shown no evidence of rape on Ellie’s body. There are also a series of tiny fibres from under Ellie’s fingernails which could belong to the killer’s clothing, but they are still being tested. Helen and Banks return to the station on the news that Pierce has been arrested…

    At the station, Banks and Helen interview Pierce. Banks tells Pierce that they know his initial statement wasn’t true; he bought a takeaway near the crime scene on the night of the murder when he had claimed that he was home all night. Pierce seems unfazed and suggests that the police should be interviewing Tyler Judd, allegedly Ellie’s boyfriend. Banks refuses to release Owen, and so he calls for a solicitor. Helen offers her opinion; Pierce might be lonely, inadequate and deluded, but that doesn’t necessarily make him a killer and their evidence thus far is circumstantial.

    The next day, Ken leads a thorough search of Pierce’s house, whilst Banks guides the Clayton’s through a press conference appealing for information about Ellie’s murder. When Glen Painter appears to know that Owen Pierce is being held in custody, Banks makes clear his frustration that the press appear to know their every move. Ken shows Banks and Helen what has been found at Pierce’s home: a great number of photographs of an actress called Maddy Phillips – Pierce’s ex-lover – who appears to bear a striking resemblance to Ellie Clayton. Banks resolves to speak to her, whilst he instructs Ken and Winsome to find Tyler Judd.

    Banks and Helen arrive at Maddy’s flat in Leeds, but are surprised to find that Glen Painter has beaten them there. Painter seems smug and promises Maddy that he will be in touch, which riles Banks. Maddy explains that her relationship with Owen is over…and crucially the relationship ended because Owen was into rough sex and on occasion wouldn’t take ‘no’ for an answer. Pierce had begun to scare her. Banks feels that this testimony will be enough to nail Pierce, but Helen, aware that Maddy is a young actress desperate for the limelight and being flattered by the press, just isn’t so sure…

    Back at the station, Banks and Helen interview Pierce again. This time Pierce admits he got confused; he did stop for the takeaway on the night of Ellie’s murder. With no evidence of rape, it is clear that someone arranged Ellie’s clothes to make it look like rape – a carefully stage managed scene. Was this theatre director Pierce?

    Meanwhile, Winsome and Blackstone interview Tyler Judd, who is proving less than cooperative and feels comfortable with the police, possibly due to his impressive criminal record for car theft. Eventually, Tyler admits that he was sleeping with Ellie, but he has no alibi for the night of the murder. Still with Pierce, Banks and Helen spell out the physical similarities between Ellie and Maddy and suggest that his sexual fantasies perhaps got the better of him, but Pierce still denies that he was even in the park where Ellie was found.

    Outside, the team are convinced that both men are lying…but all the evidence against both is lacking or circumstantial. Then a game changer; Banks is handed new forensic results and confronts Pierce again – there are traces of Ellie’s blood on Pierce’s coat! Pierce changes his story again; he was in the park, but he just bumped into Ellie and that must be how this evidence found its way onto his jacket. It sounds like a preposterous lie and Helen tries to call Pierce on it, although now Pierce has lost his temper. It is clear that Pierce is capable of violence.

    Banks is convinced that Pierce is guilty; it’s his instinct that Pierce is responsible for Ellie’s death. Helen just isn’t convinced – what about Tyler Judd? The fibres under Ellie’s fingernails don’t match Pierce’s clothes either. But Banks is certain that he has enough for a conviction…and whilst releasing Tyler Judd he orders that Pierce should be charged.

    Three months later, Pierce’s trial begins. At first, the case appears to be proceeding well, but when Winsome and Ken are cross examined by Pierce’s defence team it soon becomes clear that Ken’s actions at Pierce’s house may have landed the team in trouble. The Defence Barrister proves that when Ken saw Pierce’s cap and jacket for the first time, he was in Pierce’s house unaccompanied without a search warrant. Therefore, the evidence obtained is inadmissible. Devastated, Ken watches as the key evidence against Pierce collapses and the Judge is left with no alternative but to declare a mistrial and release Pierce.

    Banks in particular is stunned and takes the blame himself. Helen tries to persuade Banks that they just need to start again, find the killer and catch him properly this time. Banks believes that Helen is arguing for Pierce’s innocence…and as he watches Pierce drive away, becomes even more convinced of Pierce’s guilt. There is a growing distance between Helen and Banks.

    Pierce returns to his house – now vandalised. As he surveys the damage, he finds a photo of Ellie Clayton and Becca Smith and makes a decision…

    Later that evening, Becca Smith leaves her local gym and begins to walk home alone…followed closely in the dark by a sinister looking Owen Pierce.
    Love many, trust few, always paddle your own canoe

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
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    DCI Banks
    Episode: 5 of 6
    Wednesday, 7 November 2012, 9:00PM - 10:00PM
    Drama


    Innocent Graves (1/2)

    Logline:

    When a teenage schoolgirl is found strangled, Banks and his team quickly identify their prime suspect. But the closer Banks seemingly moves towards a conviction, the more the course of the investigation distances him from Helen.

    Short Synopsis:

    Frustrated with a number of recent cases being knocked back by the CPS, Banks and his team are called on to investigate the murder of teenager Ellie Clayton, daughter of a successful internet entrepreneur. The suggestion that Ellie might have been raped, as well as her background, means that the investigation is soon the subject of intense media speculation and Banks promises Ellie’s parents that they will bring the culprit to justice. Sure enough, the team quickly uncover strong evidence against Owen Pierce, a local theatre director who ran the drama workshop Ellie attended on the night that she died. Under questioning, Owen proves himself to be a liar and slightly obsessed with his ex-girlfriend Maddy Phillips, who bears a more than passing resemblance to Ellie. When clear forensic evidence links Pierce to the scene of the crime, Banks is confident that he has his man and Owen is charged. But with Pierce’s trial set, DI Morton voices her concerns; Banks’ instinct might be telling him that Pierce is guilty, but is he looking at all the evidence? There are plenty of other potential suspects, not least Ellie’s bad-boy former boyfriend, Tyler Judd. In court, Banks soon finds not just Owen Pierce, but the actions of his entire team and his friendship with Helen on trial…

    Long Synopsis:

    DCI Alan Banks breaks the bad news to his team…their latest case has been knocked back by the CPS; insufficient evidence to warrant a murder charge. Ken Blackstone in particular is hit hard by the outcome, having worked hard on the case. Banks’ frustration spills over in a meeting with McLaughlin and Helen about a recent run of cases that have failed to find favour with the CPS and he worries aloud about the impact on the morale of his team. Although McLaughlin agrees, before he can answer Banks properly, Winsome interrupts the meeting with the sombre news that Ellie Clayton’s body has been found.

    At Eastvale Valley Park, Banks and Helen are lead to Ellie’s body, which has been found close to a stone sculpture that is apparently a well-known meeting place for local teenagers. Dr Burns explains that Ellie has been strangled with her own school tie, but whilst her underwear has been ripped, forensics are unable to ascertain whether or not she has been raped from an initial examination. There is plenty of blood running down Ellie’s face, but this is dismissed as a non-fatal scalp wound. Clearly, Ellie’s school bag has been searched and there is no sign of her phone. Winsome informs Banks and Helen that a local man at the cordon is asking to speak to the officer in charge…

    As Banks and Helen move away from the crime scene, they are joined at the cordon by Glen Painter, a local newspaper reporter who begins to quiz the detectives for information about the incident. Glen proves himself to be one step ahead when he asks for confirmation that the body is Daniel Clayton’s daughter. Giving nothing away, Banks brushes Glen off and moves on to Mr Clarke, a local resident who reports noticing an unfamiliar car blocking his driveway around the time of the murder. Clarke provides a description of the owner of the vehicle – wearing a distinctive cap and jacket – and the car itself – dark blue and with a broken rear light – and Banks instructs Winsome to get him in with E-fit. Could this be Ellie’s killer?

    On route to the Clayton house, Helen explains that Daniel Clayton is co-founder of a successful auction website called lastchancetobuy.com and as such Ellie’s death is likely to have a high media profile. Once at the house, Banks and Helen meet Simon Harris, Daniel Clayton’s business partner, who along with his wife is trying to comfort the Clayton’s as they face the news of their daughter’s death. Sophie explains that Ellie had told her parents that she was going to get a pizza with her friend Becca Smith after her regular Friday night drama workshop, but when Ellie didn’t come home, they discovered through Becca that this was a lie. The relationship between the Clayton’s is strained and they appear more reliant on the Harris’ for support than each other. Daniel Clayton appears utterly devastated at his daughter’s death. Banks promises the Clayton’s that he will find whoever is responsible for this murder…

    Meanwhile, Owen Pierce, leader of Ellie’s drama workshop watches as Maddy Phillips hands out leaflets at a local shopping centre, clearly infatuated with her. At the same time Tyler Judd, a local bad-boy douses his car in petrol and lighting a cigarette, sets about burning his vehicle…

    Back at the station, Banks briefs the team. Winsome and Ken agree to interview Owen Pierce, since Ellie was last seen outside his drama workshop. Banks urges everyone to focus on the man and car seen by Mr Clarke near the murder scene close to Ellie’s murder – who was he and what was he doing there? As the briefing ends, Banks receives a message that Simon Harris would like to speak to him and travels to the lastchancetobuy.com offices. Simon informs Banks that he thinks Ellie might have had a boyfriend, but he was reluctant to share this knowledge with the Claytons. Harris claims that he came home a few months ago to find Ellie bunking off school and drinking with an older boy who he practically had to throw out of the house. Ellie had promised to never see him again, but now with her death, Harris isn’t entirely convinced…

    Ken and Winsome interview Owen Pierce at his home. Pierce is polite, but there is something creepy beneath the surface that both detectives pick up on. Pierce claims that he came straight home after the drama workshop and didn’t see anyone at all on the night of Ellie’s murder. Ken receives a phone call and leaves the room to answer it, leaving Winsome feeling uncomfortable.

    Banks and Helen visit Ellie’s school. The headmistress Mrs Bentley reveals that Ellie’s academic record had begun to improve after a slight ‘wobble’ a few months earlier which remains unexplained. Helen and Banks interview Becca Smith, who claims that Ellie didn’t have a boyfriend and that she didn’t know where Ellie was going on the night of the murder; but both detectives are convinced that Becca is hiding something.

    Back at Pierce’s house, Ken notices something in the hallway as he takes his phone call which causes him to invite Winsome outside: he is convinced the cap and jacket of the mysterious man described by Mr Clarke are now hanging in Pierce’s house. Winsome rightly points out that the cap and jacket aren’t enough evidence to arrest Pierce, no matter how creepy he might seem. But when Ken also notices a car matching Mr Clarke’s exact description in the driveway, Winsome too becomes convinced that Pierce isn’t telling them the whole truth.

    Banks returns to the Clayton house to look through Ellie’s room, where he observes that the relationship between father and daughter was unusually close. Meanwhile Helen goes to the mortuary, where Dr Glendenning explains that the post mortem has shown no evidence of rape on Ellie’s body. There are also a series of tiny fibres from under Ellie’s fingernails which could belong to the killer’s clothing, but they are still being tested. Helen and Banks return to the station on the news that Pierce has been arrested…

    At the station, Banks and Helen interview Pierce. Banks tells Pierce that they know his initial statement wasn’t true; he bought a takeaway near the crime scene on the night of the murder when he had claimed that he was home all night. Pierce seems unfazed and suggests that the police should be interviewing Tyler Judd, allegedly Ellie’s boyfriend. Banks refuses to release Owen, and so he calls for a solicitor. Helen offers her opinion; Pierce might be lonely, inadequate and deluded, but that doesn’t necessarily make him a killer and their evidence thus far is circumstantial.

    The next day, Ken leads a thorough search of Pierce’s house, whilst Banks guides the Clayton’s through a press conference appealing for information about Ellie’s murder. When Glen Painter appears to know that Owen Pierce is being held in custody, Banks makes clear his frustration that the press appear to know their every move. Ken shows Banks and Helen what has been found at Pierce’s home: a great number of photographs of an actress called Maddy Phillips – Pierce’s ex-lover – who appears to bear a striking resemblance to Ellie Clayton. Banks resolves to speak to her, whilst he instructs Ken and Winsome to find Tyler Judd.

    Banks and Helen arrive at Maddy’s flat in Leeds, but are surprised to find that Glen Painter has beaten them there. Painter seems smug and promises Maddy that he will be in touch, which riles Banks. Maddy explains that her relationship with Owen is over…and crucially the relationship ended because Owen was into rough sex and on occasion wouldn’t take ‘no’ for an answer. Pierce had begun to scare her. Banks feels that this testimony will be enough to nail Pierce, but Helen, aware that Maddy is a young actress desperate for the limelight and being flattered by the press, just isn’t so sure…

    Back at the station, Banks and Helen interview Pierce again. This time Pierce admits he got confused; he did stop for the takeaway on the night of Ellie’s murder. With no evidence of rape, it is clear that someone arranged Ellie’s clothes to make it look like rape – a carefully stage managed scene. Was this theatre director Pierce?

    Meanwhile, Winsome and Blackstone interview Tyler Judd, who is proving less than cooperative and feels comfortable with the police, possibly due to his impressive criminal record for car theft. Eventually, Tyler admits that he was sleeping with Ellie, but he has no alibi for the night of the murder. Still with Pierce, Banks and Helen spell out the physical similarities between Ellie and Maddy and suggest that his sexual fantasies perhaps got the better of him, but Pierce still denies that he was even in the park where Ellie was found.

    Outside, the team are convinced that both men are lying…but all the evidence against both is lacking or circumstantial. Then a game changer; Banks is handed new forensic results and confronts Pierce again – there are traces of Ellie’s blood on Pierce’s coat! Pierce changes his story again; he was in the park, but he just bumped into Ellie and that must be how this evidence found its way onto his jacket. It sounds like a preposterous lie and Helen tries to call Pierce on it, although now Pierce has lost his temper. It is clear that Pierce is capable of violence.

    Banks is convinced that Pierce is guilty; it’s his instinct that Pierce is responsible for Ellie’s death. Helen just isn’t convinced – what about Tyler Judd? The fibres under Ellie’s fingernails don’t match Pierce’s clothes either. But Banks is certain that he has enough for a conviction…and whilst releasing Tyler Judd he orders that Pierce should be charged.

    Three months later, Pierce’s trial begins. At first, the case appears to be proceeding well, but when Winsome and Ken are cross examined by Pierce’s defence team it soon becomes clear that Ken’s actions at Pierce’s house may have landed the team in trouble. The Defence Barrister proves that when Ken saw Pierce’s cap and jacket for the first time, he was in Pierce’s house unaccompanied without a search warrant. Therefore, the evidence obtained is inadmissible. Devastated, Ken watches as the key evidence against Pierce collapses and the Judge is left with no alternative but to declare a mistrial and release Pierce.

    Banks in particular is stunned and takes the blame himself. Helen tries to persuade Banks that they just need to start again, find the killer and catch him properly this time. Banks believes that Helen is arguing for Pierce’s innocence…and as he watches Pierce drive away, becomes even more convinced of Pierce’s guilt. There is a growing distance between Helen and Banks.

    Pierce returns to his house – now vandalised. As he surveys the damage, he finds a photo of Ellie Clayton and Becca Smith and makes a decision…

    Later that evening, Becca Smith leaves her local gym and begins to walk home alone…followed closely in the dark by a sinister looking Owen Pierce.
    Love many, trust few, always paddle your own canoe

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    At Home
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    Episode: 6 of 6
    Thursday, 8 November 2012, 9:00PM - 10:00PM

    Innocent Graves (2/2):

    Logline:

    Adamant that the collapse of his trial proves nothing, Banks is determined to prove the case against Owen Pierce before Ellie Clayton’s killer has the chance to strike again…but are his instincts right?

    Short Synopsis:

    Banks and his team must regroup: the collapse of Owen Pierce’s trial has left the case wide open and there is still a killer on the loose. Banks vows to construct a watertight legal case against Owen, still his prime suspect, although Helen urges him to keep an open mind. As the team reviews the evidence in the case, Banks warns Pierce, who has returned to a vandalised house and a shattered reputation – just because Owen is free now, that doesn’t prove that he isn’t guilty of murder and Banks will be watching him. Pierce is angry too; doesn’t Banks’ realise what an impact this ordeal has had on him? When Helen and Winsome uncover promising new leads focusing on Tyler Judd, it seems that the team might finally be closer to the truth surrounding Ellie’s murder, although Banks isn’t so sure. But when another schoolgirl is found murdered, it isn’t long before Pierce finds himself in the spotlight again. Can Banks and Helen end the killing and bring the real culprit to justice without compromising their friendship?

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